Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review

Introduction


Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Never the one to be satisfied by having a single model for a particular product line, Lenovo’s Android-powered YOGA line provides consumers with diversity. Last year, for example, we were introduced to its most ambitious model in the series – the pico-projector packing Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 Pro. For its successor, the YOGA Tab 3 Pro, they’ve reduced it to a more manageable size with its 10.1-inch screen, while also keeping the pico-projector and upgrading the specs in the process. All of this points to a resounding multimedia consuming tablet that can be enjoyed almost anywhere, but can it suffice as being a workhorse for getting work done?

The package contains:

  • Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro
  • Wall Charger
  • microUSB cable
  • Get start guide
  • Warranty Information

Design

Same familiar design, but with a more sophisticated faux-leather finish.

Intact is the design language we’ve come to expect from the series, so this one doesn’t deviate from the norm with its cylindrical hinge design and adjustable kickstand. This, though, receives a subtle improved treatment in the form of a new faux-leather finish that covers most of the back of the tablet. Combined with its durable metal chassis, it definitely gives it a more sophisticated look.

For a 10-incher, the YOGA Tab 3 Pro tips the scale on the heavier side at 667 grams. It’s worth noting, too, that Lenovo has endowed it with an IP21 certification for protection against accidental liquid splashes. Unchanged by and large from the first generation models, we still have to credit it for its incredible flexibility in how it’s used.

Most of the ports and buttons are situated in the same positions as before, but there are some changes. The biggest one pertains to the pico-projector itself, which is now incorporated into kickstand – whereas before, it was stationary in the hinge at the side. This new arrangement is a logical one because it comes with fewer hassles adjusting it, seeing that it can be positioned to our liking by rotating the kickstand.

Turning it on is done by pressing on the corresponding button embedded into the side of the hinge, which powers on the 50 lumen bulb. Honestly, the best performance is achieved in complete darkness, where it’s being projected onto a white screen. Trying to use it in a room where ambient lighting is present is challenging, since it’s just not bright enough. With a resolution of 845 x 480 pixels, details appear pixelated when it reaches the manufacturer’s rating of 70-inches, but smaller projections under the 50-inch threshold make it more ideal.

Luckily, there’s an automatic keystone correction feature that corrects trapezoid distortion – so that the projection is always perfectly level. Although we appreciate the added treat we get from having a built-in pico projector, its usability mainly hinges on the amount of ambient light that’s present. At home trying to watch a flick during the night is no problem at all, but it’s extremely challenging in a conference room in the middle of the afternoon.

 

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Display

Bright and exceptionally detailed, it’s an all-purpose thing for any condition.

Even though they’ve downsized it to a 10.1-inch IPS-LCD screen, it’s sweet knowing that they’ve increased the resolution to 2560 x 1600 pixels, which means the screen's aspect ratio is 16:10. So yeah, details are stunning and plentiful with this one, but at the same time, it comes with some favorable qualities that make it an effective thing for almost anything.

Achieving a maximum luminance of 479 nits, it’s one of the brightest screens in a tablet we’ve come across in some time, so outdoor visibility is pretty good. Colors aren’t entirely accurate, as the magenta is heavily influenced by blue, while the whole thing suffers from a dominant green, but it still packs deep and rich tones to give the screen a sense of vibrancy. Oh yeah, it even features Lenovo’s AnyPen technology that allows us to use almost any conductive object as a pen.

Display measurements and quality

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 479
(Good)
2
(Excellent)
1:1164
(Good)
7179
(Good)
2.13
2.91
(Good)
7.53
(Average)
Apple iPad Air 2 410
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
1:1063
(Good)
7001
(Good)
2.22
4.23
(Average)
2.72
(Good)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 375
(Average)
1
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
6605
(Excellent)
2.17
2.29
(Good)
1.24
(Excellent)
Microsoft Surface 3 359
(Average)
4
(Excellent)
1:700
(Poor)
6303
(Excellent)
2.17
1.58
(Excellent)
2.02
(Good)
View all

The numbers below represent the amount of deviation in the respective property, observed when a display is viewed from a 45-degree angle as opposed to direct viewing.

Maximum brightness Lower is better Minimum brightness Lower is better Contrast Lower is better Color temperature Lower is better Gamma Lower is better Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 52.8%
0%
unmeasurable
6.5%
0.5%
81.2%
510.5%
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 71%
50%
70.5%
8.8%
3.8%
10%
31.7%
Microsoft Surface 3 77.7%
75%
54.6%
2.7%
5.5%
20.9%
40.6%
Apple iPad Air 2 78.3%
75%
65.6%
11.8%
2.7%
11.1%
11%
View all

The CIE 1931 xy color gamut chart represents the set (area) of colors that a display can reproduce, with the sRGB colorspace (the highlighted triangle) serving as reference. The chart also provides a visual representation of a display's color accuracy. The small squares across the boundaries of the triangle are the reference points for the various colors, while the small dots are the actual measurements. Ideally, each dot should be positioned on top of its respective square. The 'x: CIE31' and 'y: CIE31' values in the table below the chart indicate the position of each measurement on the chart. 'Y' shows the luminance (in nits) of each measured color, while 'Target Y' is the desired luminance level for that color. Finally, 'ΔE 2000' is the Delta E value of the measured color. Delta E values of below 2 are ideal.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Color accuracy chart gives an idea of how close a display's measured colors are to their referential values. The first line holds the measured (actual) colors, while the second line holds the reference (target) colors. The closer the actual colors are to the target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Grayscale accuracy chart shows whether a display has a correct white balance (balance between red, green and blue) across different levels of grey (from dark to bright). The closer the Actual colors are to the Target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

View all


Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review

Introduction


Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
Never the one to be satisfied by having a single model for a particular product line, Lenovo’s Android-powered YOGA line provides consumers with diversity. Last year, for example, we were introduced to its most ambitious model in the series – the pico-projector packing Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 Pro. For its successor, the YOGA Tab 3 Pro, they’ve reduced it to a more manageable size with its 10.1-inch screen, while also keeping the pico-projector and upgrading the specs in the process. All of this points to a resounding multimedia consuming tablet that can be enjoyed almost anywhere, but can it suffice as being a workhorse for getting work done?

The package contains:

  • Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro
  • Wall Charger
  • microUSB cable
  • Get start guide
  • Warranty Information

Design

Same familiar design, but with a more sophisticated faux-leather finish.

Intact is the design language we’ve come to expect from the series, so this one doesn’t deviate from the norm with its cylindrical hinge design and adjustable kickstand. This, though, receives a subtle improved treatment in the form of a new faux-leather finish that covers most of the back of the tablet. Combined with its durable metal chassis, it definitely gives it a more sophisticated look.

For a 10-incher, the YOGA Tab 3 Pro tips the scale on the heavier side at 667 grams. It’s worth noting, too, that Lenovo has endowed it with an IP21 certification for protection against accidental liquid splashes. Unchanged by and large from the first generation models, we still have to credit it for its incredible flexibility in how it’s used.

Most of the ports and buttons are situated in the same positions as before, but there are some changes. The biggest one pertains to the pico-projector itself, which is now incorporated into kickstand – whereas before, it was stationary in the hinge at the side. This new arrangement is a logical one because it comes with fewer hassles adjusting it, seeing that it can be positioned to our liking by rotating the kickstand.

Turning it on is done by pressing on the corresponding button embedded into the side of the hinge, which powers on the 50 lumen bulb. Honestly, the best performance is achieved in complete darkness, where it’s being projected onto a white screen. Trying to use it in a room where ambient lighting is present is challenging, since it’s just not bright enough. With a resolution of 845 x 480 pixels, details appear pixelated when it reaches the manufacturer’s rating of 70-inches, but smaller projections under the 50-inch threshold make it more ideal.

Luckily, there’s an automatic keystone correction feature that corrects trapezoid distortion – so that the projection is always perfectly level. Although we appreciate the added treat we get from having a built-in pico projector, its usability mainly hinges on the amount of ambient light that’s present. At home trying to watch a flick during the night is no problem at all, but it’s extremely challenging in a conference room in the middle of the afternoon.


Display

Bright and exceptionally detailed, it’s an all-purpose thing for any condition.

Even though they’ve downsized it to a 10.1-inch IPS-LCD screen, it’s sweet knowing that they’ve increased the resolution to 2560 x 1600 pixels, which means the screen's aspect ratio is 16:10. So yeah, details are stunning and plentiful with this one, but at the same time, it comes with some favorable qualities that make it an effective thing for almost anything.

Achieving a maximum luminance of 479 nits, it’s one of the brightest screens in a tablet we’ve come across in some time, so outdoor visibility is pretty good. Colors aren’t entirely accurate, as the magenta is heavily influenced by blue, while the whole thing suffers from a dominant green, but it still packs deep and rich tones to give the screen a sense of vibrancy. Oh yeah, it even features Lenovo’s AnyPen technology that allows us to use almost any conductive object as a pen.

Display measurements and quality

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 479
(Good)
2
(Excellent)
1:1164
(Good)
7179
(Good)
2.13
2.91
(Good)
7.53
(Average)
Apple iPad Air 2 410
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
1:1063
(Good)
7001
(Good)
2.22
4.23
(Average)
2.72
(Good)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 375
(Average)
1
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
6605
(Excellent)
2.17
2.29
(Good)
1.24
(Excellent)
Microsoft Surface 3 359
(Average)
4
(Excellent)
1:700
(Poor)
6303
(Excellent)
2.17
1.58
(Excellent)
2.02
(Good)
View all

The numbers below represent the amount of deviation in the respective property, observed when a display is viewed from a 45-degree angle as opposed to direct viewing.

Maximum brightness Lower is better Minimum brightness Lower is better Contrast Lower is better Color temperature Lower is better Gamma Lower is better Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 52.8%
0%
unmeasurable
6.5%
0.5%
81.2%
510.5%
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 71%
50%
70.5%
8.8%
3.8%
10%
31.7%
Microsoft Surface 3 77.7%
75%
54.6%
2.7%
5.5%
20.9%
40.6%
Apple iPad Air 2 78.3%
75%
65.6%
11.8%
2.7%
11.1%
11%
View all

The CIE 1931 xy color gamut chart represents the set (area) of colors that a display can reproduce, with the sRGB colorspace (the highlighted triangle) serving as reference. The chart also provides a visual representation of a display's color accuracy. The small squares across the boundaries of the triangle are the reference points for the various colors, while the small dots are the actual measurements. Ideally, each dot should be positioned on top of its respective square. The 'x: CIE31' and 'y: CIE31' values in the table below the chart indicate the position of each measurement on the chart. 'Y' shows the luminance (in nits) of each measured color, while 'Target Y' is the desired luminance level for that color. Finally, 'ΔE 2000' is the Delta E value of the measured color. Delta E values of below 2 are ideal.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Color accuracy chart gives an idea of how close a display's measured colors are to their referential values. The first line holds the measured (actual) colors, while the second line holds the reference (target) colors. The closer the actual colors are to the target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Grayscale accuracy chart shows whether a display has a correct white balance (balance between red, green and blue) across different levels of grey (from dark to bright). The closer the Actual colors are to the Target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

View all


Interface and Functionality

The updated experience puts the PRO in professional.

We’ve never been fond of Lenovo’s customized Android experiences in the past, mainly because of the disorganization of the homescreen due to the elimination of the apps panel, as well as its boring operation. That all changes because this model brings out the PRO in its name, delivering the productivity goods in making its custom Android 5.1 Lollipop experience more versatile and diversified than ever before.

Not only is there an actual apps panel this time around, making for a far cleaner and organized homescreen, but Lenovo’s skin is equipped with a new enhanced multi-tasking feature that rivals the implementation we get from TouchWiz or LG’s experiences. It has since been improved here in the YOGA Tab 3 Pro, as more apps are now supported by it. And yes, there’s now support for multiple users as well – so that each account has access to its own apps and content.

Lenovo’s approach is more ambitious with the YOGA Tab 3 Pro, which is a direction that we like. While there’s no denying that the experience is especially inviting for multimedia consumption, with the pico projector and all, it’s also adept in handling the intricacies that professionals crave with the software’s various enhancements and productivity centric features.

System Performance

Intel’s chip is good to handle the easy and fluffy stuff, but not entirely great for gaming.

Siding with Intel once again, the YOGA Tab 3 Pro receives an upgraded quad-core 2.24GHz Intel Atom Z8500 processor coupled with 2GB of LPDDR3 RAM. This newer chipset proves quite effective at dealing with the demanding operations of its enhanced multi-tasking experience, but it can still be overwhelmed at times. This is especially noticeable when it comes to gaming, where it sputters out choppier frame rates that prevent it from being a true powerhouse.

Performance benchmarks

AnTuTu
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 62856
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 50148
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 46852
Vellamo Metal
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 1474
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 1478
Vellamo Browser
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 4671
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 3552
Sunspider
Lower is better
Apple iPad Air 2 303.3
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 1011.2
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 818.5
Microsoft Surface 3 458.4
GFXBench T-Rex HD on-screen
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 52.2
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 29
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 11
Microsoft Surface 3 21.2
GFXBench Manhattan on-screen
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 24.1
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 12
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 24
Microsoft Surface 3 12.2
Basemark OS II
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 1880
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 1183
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 1338
Geekbench 3 single-core
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 1811
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 905
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 992
Geekbench 3 multi-core
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 4488
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 3676
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 3174
View all


Camera

The camera receive a considerable upgrade, but its performance is still a wash.

Already, it’s been treated to newer hardware just about everywhere we look – and that extends to its cameras too. Featuring a 13-megapixel rear and 5-megapixel rear combination, the upgraded treatment signifies the gap distinction between it and the other models in the series.

Unfortunately, the camera experience leaves more to be desired. Our biggest complaint is simply the long time that’s needed to snap a shot. The focus adjustment seems decent, but it simply takes forever for it to finally snap the shot, save it, and get us back to snapping another one. Despite that, the interface lays claim to an abundant set of shooting mores – so that’ll appease shutterbugs at the very least.


Image Quality


Regardless of its beefier megapixel count, the camera’s performance is not to today’s standards. It’s honestly not bad for a tablet, but don’t expect it to replace your smartphone for the occasion. Some of its qualities when the lighting conditions are ideal include soft details, colder looking colors, and chances of over-exposure.

Things don’t get any better under low light, where fine details become non-existent – delivering compositions that are generally smeary in tone. Not only that, but colors are subdued and there’s some presence of digital noise too.


Camera speed

Taking a pic (sec)Lower is better Taking an HDR pic (sec)Lower is better CamSpeed score Higher is better CamSpeed score with flash Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 2
No data
401
No data
Apple iPad Air 2 2.5
3
No data
No data
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 5
No data
394
No data
Microsoft Surface 3 5.5
No data
No data
No data
View all

Video Quality


Clearly, it’s not a strong performer with its still image capture, so we’re not having high expectations with video recording either, which tops out at 1080p. Yet again, its performance is rather flat, producing videos that are light with the details. Never once are we convinced that it’s capturing footage in ‘high-definition.’ Its quality is also marred by its noticeable artifacting elements, over-exposure, and dull colors.


Multimedia

The Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro is a multimedia powerhouse.

When it comes to listening to our favorite jams, it’s the Google Play Music app that’s on tap for the occasion. Looking beneath its display, we have its speaker grill extending along the entire width of the tablet – hiding away four integrated JBL speakers. Even without enabling Dolby Atmos, the speakers deliver an immersive experience with its robust tones. Trust us, it’s exceptionally loud with its output of 79.4 dB, but its quality can be further refined by enabling Dolby Atmos.

Watching videos has never been this fun, seeing that the Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro is a movie watcher’s dream. Sure, the display is good enough on its own, especially when we can prop the tablet up with its kickstand, but Lenovo’s commitment in making it a multimedia centric tablet is evident by the multi-tasking implementation it offers.

And best of all, we can use the built-in projector to change things up from the norm. Like we mentioned earlier, it’s suited best for nighttime use because its peak brightness isn’t enough when ambient light infiltrates the experience. How many tablets can project a video onto the ceiling in your bedroom?

Audio output

Headphones output power (Volts)
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 1.19
Microsoft Surface 3 1.027
Apple iPad Air 2 0.97
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 0.323
Loudspeaker loudness (dB)
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 74.4
Microsoft Surface 3 69.9
Apple iPad Air 2 77.9
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 79.4
View all


Battery

Don’t worry, this one is above average with its battery life and recharge time.

Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro Review
You want to know why this 10.1-inch tablet is heavy? Well, it’s attributed to the 10,200 mAh battery stuffed inside of it, which delivers better-than-average results. Power users will especially appreciate its all-day battery life, ensuring that it won’t sputter out before it’s bed time.

Our custom battery test also reaffirms its longevity, where it reaches an on-screen time of 9 hours and 27 minutes. Using the included charger, it’s quite efficient too at recharging because it takes 162 minutes to get back to full capacity. That’s faster than some of the recent tablet’s we’ve come across of late.

Battery Benchmarks

Battery life (hours)
Higher is better
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 9h 27 min (Excellent)
Apple iPad Air 2 7h 27 min (Good)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 6h 46 min (Average)
Microsoft Surface 3 6h 46 min (Average)
Charging time (minutes)
Lower is better
Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro 162
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch 263
Microsoft Surface 3 260
View all

Conclusion


This year’s Lenovo YOGA Tab 3 Pro is better in every single way than its predecessor. Its more compact size makes it more travel-friendly, but they’ve addressed some design concerns we had with the previous model – namely the placement of the projector and certain aspects of the software.
What’s really swell in all of this, is that it strikes a chord with both multimedia buffs and professionals that want to get work done. Indeed, its $499.99 price point means that it’s competing against the like of the Apple iPad Air 2, the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7-inch, and even the Google Nexus 9, but it certainly offers an entertaining package for the money.

The specs are good, the software is improved, the battery life is long lasting, and the projector certainly has its added benefits. All of this just points to a tablet that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Software version of the review unit:
Android Version: 5.1
Build Number: LenovoYT3-X90F_S100153_151102
Kernel Version: 3.14.37-x86_64_L1-R415-g3f45113




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