Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review

Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Introduction


Very few tablets stray from the normal slate designs we’re accustomed to seeing, but Lenovo surprised many late last year when they unveiled the peculiar looking, Android-powered Yoga Tablet line. One year later, they’re readying themselves for the upcoming holiday season with its successor in the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 – one that looks unchanged on the outside, but is treated to the usual hardware upgrades on the inside. Several notable tablets have launched already in time for the holiday season, possibly overshadowing the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 in the process, but its $299.99 cost might prove attractive enough to pursue for many consumers out there.

The package contains:
  • microUSB cable
  • microfiber cloth
  • Wall charger
  • Getting to know guide

Design

Nothing has changed with the design, but it’s still a refreshing, peculiar looking slate.

Flaunting the same unorthodox design of its predecessor, one that stands out for its bottom positioned hand-like kickstand, there’s nothing different that separates it from what we’ve seen previously. Factoring in its inexpensive price point, it’s somewhat relieving to know that the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 exhibits an attractive design – aided by its svelte construction and its metal-plastic casing combination. Naturally, it’s heavy towards the side where its cylindrical hinge is located, but it delivers an ergonomic feel when holding it with a single hand.

Quickly peeking around the tablet, all of the ports and buttons from before are present here once again. Interestingly, though, they’ve made some improvements to the tablet by allowing its kickstand to extend all the way to a full 180-degrees. Although it’s a nice gesture, we don’t find this new “hang” mode as practical as the others, but hey, it’s an option for those who just need to hang the tablet on something. In addition, it now bears front-firing large-chamber stereo speakers with Wolfson Master HiFi audio processing and Dolby surround sound.

 

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Display

We can’t complain about the display, it has enough of the elements to make it attractive.

One of our biggest complaints with last year’s model was the low-resolution screen it was packing, which interestingly enough, was made right with the arrival of the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 HD+. Well, the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2's display is sporting pretty much the same characteristics as that aforementioned variant – a 10.1-inch 1920 x 1200 IPS LCD display. Color temperature is fairly tolerable, at around 7300 K, with red colors lacking a bit of intensity in comparison with green and blue. As a result, it's a somewhat cold-looking screen, but not to an unbearable extent.

Overall, we’re content with the results, thanks to its good looking details, lush-looking color reproduction, and decent 398 nit brightness. Sure, there’s a little bit of bleeding around the edges, but it’s only evident when the screen is displaying only the color black.

Display measurements and quality

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 533
(Excellent)
18
(Poor)
1:1255
(Excellent)
6809
(Excellent)
2.04
3.97
(Good)
3.5
(Good)
Apple iPad Air 2 410
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
1:1063
(Good)
7001
(Good)
2.22
4.23
(Average)
2.72
(Good)
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 404
(Good)
3
(Excellent)
1:1443
(Excellent)
7325
(Good)
2.41
10.04
(Poor)
6.04
(Average)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 395
(Average)
2
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
7042
(Good)
2.08
2.39
(Good)
3.06
(Good)
View all

The numbers below represent the amount of deviation in the respective property, observed when a display is viewed from a 45-degree angle as opposed to direct viewing.

Maximum brightness Lower is better Minimum brightness Lower is better Contrast Lower is better Color temperature Lower is better Gamma Lower is better Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 52.2%
50%
unmeasurable
2.7%
1.4%
71.5%
57.5%
Apple iPad Air 2 78.3%
75%
65.6%
11.8%
2.7%
11.1%
11%
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 80.9%
83.3%
65.6%
19.3%
11.8%
28%
97.1%
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 81.2%
66.7%
75.1%
22.8%
10.4%
5.6%
34.6%
View all

The CIE 1931 xy color gamut chart represents the set (area) of colors that a display can reproduce, with the sRGB colorspace (the highlighted triangle) serving as reference. The chart also provides a visual representation of a display's color accuracy. The small squares across the boundaries of the triangle are the reference points for the various colors, while the small dots are the actual measurements. Ideally, each dot should be positioned on top of its respective square. The 'x: CIE31' and 'y: CIE31' values in the table below the chart indicate the position of each measurement on the chart. 'Y' shows the luminance (in nits) of each measured color, while 'Target Y' is the desired luminance level for that color. Finally, 'ΔE 2000' is the Delta E value of the measured color. Delta E values of below 2 are ideal.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Color accuracy chart gives an idea of how close a display's measured colors are to their referential values. The first line holds the measured (actual) colors, while the second line holds the reference (target) colors. The closer the actual colors are to the target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Grayscale accuracy chart shows whether a display has a correct white balance (balance between red, green and blue) across different levels of grey (from dark to bright). The closer the Actual colors are to the Target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

View all

Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review

Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Introduction


Very few tablets stray from the normal slate designs we’re accustomed to seeing, but Lenovo surprised many late last year when they unveiled the peculiar looking, Android-powered Yoga Tablet line. One year later, they’re readying themselves for the upcoming holiday season with its successor in the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 – one that looks unchanged on the outside, but is treated to the usual hardware upgrades on the inside. Several notable tablets have launched already in time for the holiday season, possibly overshadowing the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 in the process, but its $299.99 cost might prove attractive enough to pursue for many consumers out there.

The package contains:
  • microUSB cable
  • microfiber cloth
  • Wall charger
  • Getting to know guide

Design

Nothing has changed with the design, but it’s still a refreshing, peculiar looking slate.

Flaunting the same unorthodox design of its predecessor, one that stands out for its bottom positioned hand-like kickstand, there’s nothing different that separates it from what we’ve seen previously. Factoring in its inexpensive price point, it’s somewhat relieving to know that the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 exhibits an attractive design – aided by its svelte construction and its metal-plastic casing combination. Naturally, it’s heavy towards the side where its cylindrical hinge is located, but it delivers an ergonomic feel when holding it with a single hand.

Quickly peeking around the tablet, all of the ports and buttons from before are present here once again. Interestingly, though, they’ve made some improvements to the tablet by allowing its kickstand to extend all the way to a full 180-degrees. Although it’s a nice gesture, we don’t find this new “hang” mode as practical as the others, but hey, it’s an option for those who just need to hang the tablet on something. In addition, it now bears front-firing large-chamber stereo speakers with Wolfson Master HiFi audio processing and Dolby surround sound.


Display

We can’t complain about the display, it has enough of the elements to make it attractive.

One of our biggest complaints with last year’s model was the low-resolution screen it was packing, which interestingly enough, was made right with the arrival of the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 HD+. Well, the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2's display is sporting pretty much the same characteristics as that aforementioned variant – a 10.1-inch 1920 x 1200 IPS LCD display. Color temperature is fairly tolerable, at around 7300 K, with red colors lacking a bit of intensity in comparison with green and blue. As a result, it's a somewhat cold-looking screen, but not to an unbearable extent.

Overall, we’re content with the results, thanks to its good looking details, lush-looking color reproduction, and decent 398 nit brightness. Sure, there’s a little bit of bleeding around the edges, but it’s only evident when the screen is displaying only the color black.

Display measurements and quality

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 533
(Excellent)
18
(Poor)
1:1255
(Excellent)
6809
(Excellent)
2.04
3.97
(Good)
3.5
(Good)
Apple iPad Air 2 410
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
1:1063
(Good)
7001
(Good)
2.22
4.23
(Average)
2.72
(Good)
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 404
(Good)
3
(Excellent)
1:1443
(Excellent)
7325
(Good)
2.41
10.04
(Poor)
6.04
(Average)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 395
(Average)
2
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
7042
(Good)
2.08
2.39
(Good)
3.06
(Good)
View all

The numbers below represent the amount of deviation in the respective property, observed when a display is viewed from a 45-degree angle as opposed to direct viewing.

Maximum brightness Lower is better Minimum brightness Lower is better Contrast Lower is better Color temperature Lower is better Gamma Lower is better Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 52.2%
50%
unmeasurable
2.7%
1.4%
71.5%
57.5%
Apple iPad Air 2 78.3%
75%
65.6%
11.8%
2.7%
11.1%
11%
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 80.9%
83.3%
65.6%
19.3%
11.8%
28%
97.1%
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 81.2%
66.7%
75.1%
22.8%
10.4%
5.6%
34.6%
View all

The CIE 1931 xy color gamut chart represents the set (area) of colors that a display can reproduce, with the sRGB colorspace (the highlighted triangle) serving as reference. The chart also provides a visual representation of a display's color accuracy. The small squares across the boundaries of the triangle are the reference points for the various colors, while the small dots are the actual measurements. Ideally, each dot should be positioned on top of its respective square. The 'x: CIE31' and 'y: CIE31' values in the table below the chart indicate the position of each measurement on the chart. 'Y' shows the luminance (in nits) of each measured color, while 'Target Y' is the desired luminance level for that color. Finally, 'ΔE 2000' is the Delta E value of the measured color. Delta E values of below 2 are ideal.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Color accuracy chart gives an idea of how close a display's measured colors are to their referential values. The first line holds the measured (actual) colors, while the second line holds the reference (target) colors. The closer the actual colors are to the target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

The Grayscale accuracy chart shows whether a display has a correct white balance (balance between red, green and blue) across different levels of grey (from dark to bright). The closer the Actual colors are to the Target ones, the better.

This measurements are made using SpectraCal's CalMAN calibration software.

View all

Interface and Functionality

Lenovo appropriately enhances the experience to give it a more rounded appeal.

Still favoring the same simplified interface from before, the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2’s customized Android 4.4.2 KitKat experience receives some new features that make it more versatile. Visually, it’s rather conventional looking and straightforward – though, it can be a bit cluttered looking due to the elimination of the traditional apps panel, so all icons are placed on the homescreen.


In enhancing the experience, Lenovo has tweaked the interface by adding a multi-tasking element where pressing the button on the bottom left corner of the UI presents us with a few supported apps – such as Email, Gallery, Chrome, File Browser, Calculator, and Video. At the most, we’re able to select up to three of the apps, as they’re launched in their own respective windows.

Additionally, Lenovo is attempting to paint the Yoga Tablet 2 as a productivity centric tablet – despite its mainstream attachment. They’re able to achieve this by appropriately optimizing the layout arrangement of several native apps for tablet usage, so multi-paned windows are heavily used. And finally, it comes preloaded with Kingsoft Office’s WPS Office app, giving us the ability to edit and create text documents, presentation slides, and spreadsheets.

Processor and Memory

Armed with Intel’s new 64-bit based Intel Atom chip, the tablet runs smoothly for most things, but don’t expect mind-blowing results with gaming.

Intel inside, that’s what’s under the hood with the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2. Specifically, it’s powered by a quad-core 1.33GHz Intel Atom Z3745 chip that’s based on 64-bit architecture – coupled with 2GB of RAM and the Intel HD Graphics GPU. Needless to say, it handles most tasks with ease, but we wouldn’t go far to say that it’s the best thing for gaming. It’s tolerable enough for certain games, though, it’s nowhere as buttery smooth as some other high-end tablets.

Stuffed with 16GB of storage, that’s a capacity we’re content to find on such an inexpensive tablet – plus, that capacity can be supplemented thanks to its microSD card slot.

Performance benchmarks

AnTuTu
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 62856
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 45408
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 34982
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 33011
Vellamo Metal
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 1383
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 1139
Vellamo Browser
Higher is better
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 1568
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 2323
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 2722
Sunspider
Lower is better
Apple iPad Air 2 303.3
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 749.4
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 1089.9
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 753.9
GFXBench T-Rex HD on-screen
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 52.2
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 13.9
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 17.4
GFXBench Manhattan on-screen
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 24.1
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 2.9
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 9.3
Basemark OS II
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 1880
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 1157
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 818
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 790
Geekbench 3 single-core
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 1811
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 1043
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 766
Geekbench 3 multi-core
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 4488
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 3039
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 2386
View all

Internet and Connectivity


With Chrome being its native web browser, we can’t complain about the surfing experience on the tablet, mainly because of its sharp display, quick page loads, and decent on-the-fly rendering. Scrolling is okay, but it’s a little bit jittery with its movement at time. However, we do appreciate the new multi-tasking aspect that’s available to us – where we can access Chrome at any time in its own separate window.

At the moment, there are no plans to make a variant with cellular data connectivity – albeit, there seems to be a placeholder for a SIM slot near the microSD slot. Nevertheless, it’s armed the usual connectivity features such as aGPS, Bluetooth 4.0, and dual-band 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi. Sadly, though, NFC has been omitted from its arsenal.


Camera

Some improvements make its image quality acceptable this time.

This year’s camera has been upgraded to an 8-megapixel one, up from the 5-megapixel snapper of its predecessor. Unfortunately, though, its placement is still in the same location as before – built into the corner of its cylindrical hinge, where it can sometimes be covered as we hold the tablet. Despite that, the camera app is rich with several shooting modes and manual controls that offer us plenty of control in what we want to capture.



First and foremost, we have to point out the painfully slow focus of the camera – it’s just frustrating due to the lengthy time needed for it to adjust. Luckily, the higher resolution camera enables this year’s model to capture a little more detail, giving it a sharper overall look. However, there are times when its quality softens due to noise, an over-exposed composition, and dull colors. Just as long lighting is plentiful, you’ll capture some good looking shots.1080p video recording is similarly passable. Generally, detail level is OK with the footage, while colors tend to have a nice and warm tone to them, similarly to the still images. The frame rate of the recorded video footage is stable enough, but we just can't help but hate the thin and overly sharp audio recording. It kind of ruins the whole thing somewhat, but it's usable. The camcorder supports continuous autofocus, but it works rather slow.

Camera speed

Taking a pic (sec)Lower is better Taking an HDR pic (sec)Lower is better CamSpeed score Higher is better CamSpeed score with flash Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 2.5
3
No data
No data
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 3.2
3.7
472
270
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 3.2
6
No data
No data
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 3.63
No data
No data
No data
View all


Multimedia

Dolby sound enhances the audio quality, while its sharp and vivid screen, in combination with its kickstand, makes it perfect for video watching.

The sole and native music player is the Google Play Music app, so there’s nothing new here that we haven’t seen or experienced elsewhere. Projecting audio through its dual front-firing speakers, it musters up a respectable output of 74.6 dB. Without its Dolby sound enabled, the quality sounds flat and thin, but turning on gives it a marginally cleaner tone.

Watching movies is a joy on the Lenovo Yoga Table 2, just because of that hand-free experience with its kickstand. The bigger head turner here, though, is how we can rely on the Lenovo Smart Switch to modify the display to produce a more vibrant color reproduction – allowing videos to appear livelier in tone.


Audio output

Headphones output power (Volts)
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 0.97
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 0.65
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 0.54
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 0.21
Loudspeaker loudness (dB)
Higher is better
Apple iPad Air 2 77.9
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 71.9
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 76
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 74.6
View all

Battery

Battery life is significantly better than that of most tablets.

Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) Review
Improving upon its predecessor, the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 features a larger 9600 mAh, which is able to produce a mark of 10 hours and 28 minutes in our battery benchmark test. That alone puts it in the above average category, besting other reputable entrants such as the Google Nexus 8, Amazon Fire HDX 8.9, and Apple iPad Air 2. In our real world experience, its fully charged battery powers us through nearly 2 full days of normal usage.

Battery Benchmarks

Battery life (hours)
Higher is better
Lenovo YOGA Tablet 2 10-inch (Android) 10h 28 min (Excellent)
Amazon Fire HDX 8.9 9h 32 min (Excellent)
Apple iPad Air 2 7h 27 min (Good)
Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 7h 2 min (Good)
View all

Conclusion


For a brand new 10-inch tablet, the Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 isn’t that bad of an option when we look at its $299.99 cost. Certainly, there are several other notable tablets that have better specs, or offer a deeper experience, but its price point is undoubtedly hard to look away from. Frankly, it undercuts several of its main rivals. There aren’t as many profound changes with this year’s model, but at the end of the day, if you’re looking for a decent tablet that won’t break the bank, and has a subtle productivity element attached to it, you’ll be thoroughly surprised by what the Yoga Tablet 2 offers. 

Software version of the review unit:
Android Version: 4.4.2
Software Version: YOGA Tablet 2-1050F_141105
Build Number: YOGATablet2-1050F_S000067_141105
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