Introduction

LG is a veteran of sorts in the emerging niche of smart wearables. The Watch Urbane is a third generation device refining one of the early circular designs that seem to be the thing now. Smart watches are aiming for a less gadgety look in favor of a classic timepiece design. It's what helped the LG G Watch R get noticed and the Urbane is a cautious refresh rather than a complete overhaul.

LG Watch Urbane

The LG Watch Urbane isn't doing anything crazy and that's not necessarily a bad thing. The new smartwatch has kept the size, screen technology and most of the hardware of the G Watch R, packaging it all up in an even more traditional timepiece exterior.

Although there's no mechanism inside, in classic watch terms, the G Watch R is using an interesting combination of internals. If the hardware specs sound familiar to you, that's no coincidence. The software has received a welcome upgrade though.

Key features

  • 1.3" Full Circle P-OLED display, 320 x 320 pixels, 245ppi, 33mm screen diameter
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 (MSM8226), quad-core 1.2GHz Cortex-A7 CPU, 512MB of RAM, 4GB of internal storage (3GB available to user)
  • 410mAh Li-Ion battery, rated at 2 days of uptime
  • 45.5 x 52.2 x 10.9mm, 66.5g, genuine leather stitched strap, 22mm, changeable
  • Stainless steel casing, IP-67 certified, water-resistant for 30 minutes, up to 1 meter deep
  • Android Wear 5.1.1 with Google Now integration
  • PPG Heart rate sensor, 9-axis gyro, accelerometer, compass, barometer
  • Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 LE
  • Vibration

Main disadvantages

  • Polished exterior isn't particularly subtle. Perhaps a touch too much gloss
  • Limited choice of casing colors, no black option
  • Android Wear still suffers bugs and stability issues
  • No ambient light sensor

So, the LG Watch Urbane is pretty similar to its predecessor. The overall form-factor is almost identical, as LG has gone for a classic round watch face once again. The 1.3-inch P-OLED display seems to be the right choice of screen technology in terms of power efficiency and sunlight legibility.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

LG Watch Urbane official photos

The internals are also mostly borrowed from the G Watch R. There are a few notable additions, like Wi-Fi, but the basics remain unchanged. LG has skipped on GPS and a speaker yet again, both available in the Samsung rival. Admittedly, both would have decreased battery life and don't quite fit in the current Android Wear concept.

It is definitely worth noting that there is an LTE version of the wearable out there, but the two have nearly nothing in common beyond the looks - with different size and weight, hardware and, above all, the underlying platform. Android Wear powers the regular version while the Urbane LTE was done on LG's own time, so to speak, relying on the WebOS-based LG Wearable Platform.

By the looks of it, the LG Watch Urbane is a mildly updated version of its well-received predecessor, mostly intended to take a new market turn and target a more formal, business lifestyle. It currently retails for about $349, which is about what the cheapest Apple Watch costs, and a good $100 more than the G Watch R.

So, is the upgrade worth that much and is the new wearable capable of becoming an instant classic? Follow along as we try to find out.

Unboxing

With the Watch Urbane, LG has decided to go with a two-piece square box, which is a lot more compact than that of the G Watch R. The material itself makes quite a good first impression. It is neither glossy, nor too plain, with a sort of satin finish that feels soft and premium. Whatever the coating, the box, as well as the internal compartments, are extra pleasant to the touch.

The inside of the box is neatly packed with the watch siting comfortable on a cradle of the aforementioned material and underneath it, three separate containers. LG obviously paid due attention to the packaging and, frankly, presentation plays no smaller part in the premium category than the actual content. Other than that, the Watch Urbane is bundled with the same set of accessories as its predecessor.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Unboxing the LG Watch Urbane

Inside the box, you get a sturdy USB cable, a power adapter and the proprietary round charging dock. The round magnetic station works exactly the same and looks almost identical, with five pins to the side and an LG Logo in the middle.

This led us to believe that the two chargers are interchangeable, but this is not exactly the case. The Watch Urbane doesn't fit seamlessly in the older G Watch R's dock. The magnet still pulls it in, but the match just isn't perfect. With some fiddling, you'll be able to properly position it to get charged if you have to but it just won't be as comfortable as using the original.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The Watch Urbane has a slightly changes charging dock

Design and build quality

The Watch Urbane is definitely targeted at a different audience. Whereas the G Watch R was a little bit sportier with its black plastic casing, the obvious intention with the Watch Urbane was to bring a lot more class to the exterior. Both devices are stylish, but in quite different ways.

The LG Watch Urbane is a lot more sophisticated and "grown-up". Its metal body and stitched leather strap give out a more classic timepiece feel. Really, it is quite simple, the G Watch R is something you could wear jogging or riding a bike, while the Watch Urbane feels better suited to more formal settings.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The LG Watch Urbane sports a very classic look

The sensors are all still there and you could definitely use the Watch Urbane in your workouts just like its predecessor, but its exterior isn't really the mud-sweat-and-gear type. Speaking of, the silver metal body is quite slick, but easily covered in smudges. On the back, things are a lot cleaner. The plate is still metal, but with a matte finish and a circular brushed-metal accent, covering most of the area. It definitely looks and feels classier than the all-plastic shell of its predecessor.

LG Watch Urbane

The overall shape of the unit is quite similar to the one of the G Watch R, but slightly slimmer all-around. The exact measurements are 45.5 x 52.2 x 10.9mm and the watch weighs in at 66.5 grams. It is clearly elongated and the angle at which it slopes toward the strap is a lot softer. So, even though the Watch Urbane is smaller on paper, its shape makes it look a bulkier when put on. It is also a few grams heavier, undoubtedly due to the metal shell. After wearing both devices for quite some time, there is a noticeable difference. The Watch Urbane simply refuses to lay as close to your wrist as the G Watch R.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The little accents tie everything together

The metal bezel is notably thinner and has a softer slope toward the screen. The painted number dial is also missing, which we are sure nobody will miss. The strap on the LG Watch Urbane is made of genuine leather and so was the one on the G Watch R. This time around, however, the design benefits from nice little accent such as the stitching and a buckle in the same color as the body.

The Watch Urbane comes in two color options. The silver, which we have, has an almost chrome-like finish, while the other is a more garish rose gold. Part of the effort perhaps to target a different demographic than geeks and outdoor enthusiasts. Maybe even reaching out to potential female buyers but, frankly, we can't really see the Watch Urbane pulling this one off.

The strap is once again a standard 22mm, so it can be easily swapped out. Perhaps a metal one down the road would make a difference too. Anyway, the current one is made of leather, like the G Watch R's, but it just looks and feels better. The material is a lot more solid and the finish looks more durable, which was definitely a problem for the G Watch R.

The buckle on the LG Watch Urbane has gotten quite a bit smaller. It is made of metal, just like the body and really feels sturdy. Plus, you can't go wrong with such a classic mechanism. It just works and adds another nice touch to the overall appearance.

LG Watch Urbane

The main goal of the Watch Urbane really seems to be a different kind of appeal. The device does look a lot more sophisticated, a clear attempt to make a geeky gadget more relevant in a corporate setting.

Hardware overview

Under the hood, the Watch Urbane is a lot more similar to its predecessor than you might think. The round display, to start with, is borrowed from the G Watch R.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The LG Watch Urbane and G Watch R side by side

This, however, is no reason to complain. The 1.3-inch P-OLED pane is a pleasure to look at and can be considered the benchmark for round-face wearables. It offers a resolution of 320x320 and a pixel density of 246ppi, which makes for nice sharp images.

LG Watch Urbane

Being an OLED means the contrast is outstanding due to the black pixels using no backlighting at all and the colors are punchy. It's also quite bright.

Side viewing angles are fine and although reflectivity is still a bit of an issue, the screen seems to behave slightly better outdoors than the G Watch R. Rather disappointingly though, there is still no Gorilla Glass or sapphire covering the display. Third-party solutions are available so, if you fear getting your watch scratched, it might be a good idea to pick up a protector.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The display of the watch is gorgeous

The rest of the internals are also identical. Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 (MSM8226), quad-core 1.2GHz Cortex-A7 CPU, 512MB RAM, 4GB of inbuilt storage.

The Watch Urbane does, however have one notable new feature, built in Wi-Fi. This will surely be a big one for Android wearables, as it makes them a lot more independent of your smartphone. The Watch Urbane can now receive notifications even If it is not within Bluetooth range.

The new Wi-Fi feature is definitely interesting, but has also sparked a lot of controversy. As it turns out, the older LG G Watch R does, in fact, have the required hardware as well but for one reason or another, LG refuses to enable Wi-Fi on the device. The official explanation is that the device never got its certification for the Wi-Fi radio, which is impossible to obtain at this point. But, understandably, a lot of users are viewing this as a cheap trick to convince prospective buyers to skip straight to the new model.

We'll just have to wait and see how the whole thing gets resolved.

Battery life

Seeing how the LG Watch Urbane is equipped with the same 410mAh battery and has the same screen as its predecessor, one could only assume that it will consume just as much power. This is mostly true, as long as you opt to use WiFi sparingly.

Even with the always on feature, we managed to get about two days of average use from the device. Even if pushed harder and with WiFi on, it is capable of getting through the day, which is what's expected from it by today's standards. Which is to say, it's competitive but hardly exceptional.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The Watch Urbane looks a little too chunky on the wrist

We also have to note that the Bluetooth module in the Watch urbane has been bumped up to version 4.1, which is a bit more power-efficient. Still, be mindful of the WiFi. On the flip side, charging is quite quick. The dock tops up the little battery in around 30 minutes, which you will probably find an opportunity to sneak in even during the day.

Overall, we really see the LG Watch Urbane as a refinement of the G Watch R and this is more of a compliment than anything else. The new wearable aims to build on the sufficient popularity of the predecessor while experimenting with a different styling.

This is really crucial if smartwatches are to really make a difference beyond a small market niche. Also, LG hasn't exactly skipped on innovations either and is once again at the forefront of Android Wear development.

Follow us to the next part to find out what new software tricks the Watch Urbane has to offer.

Fresh new Android Wear with extra tricks

The LG Watch Urbane is powered by Google's latest Android wear - making its debut on the wearable. The Watch Urbane is the very first device to run the Android 5.1.1 based OS, which does add a certain level of exclusivity.

This, however, will be short-lived, as the said version will start seeding to other eligible devices pretty soon. So, if you are considering picking up the Urbane just for its software superiority, you might want to reconsider. Furthermore, there are still some kinks to iron out. They will surely be sorted in the future but, at the moment, bugs are to be expected.

LG Watch Urbane

Among other things, the new OS version enables screenshots straight off the device, a feature that was missing in previous versions. Thanks to this, we can provide you with some visual aids as we go about the review. The feature, however, is far from perfect. Screenshot are triggered from the smartphone, only one at a time and do not get automatically saved. It is still a kind of a hassle, but better than nothing.

The UI itself, although far from a major overhaul, brings a few changes. Most of them are pretty subtle and might even go unnoticed. The color scheme is slightly updated and animations have been improved. There is a lot of fine detail, like for example, when you enter the main menu, the top shows three small icons that signify the different screens. A few seconds later, they transform into dots to finally disappear altogether.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Subtle animations in the tabbed main interface

Android Wear is still based on the same basic navigation concept, but is better organized. The UI is still card-based, much like Google Now. You generally have to swipe right to dismiss a screen and left to open contextual options and go deeper.

A swipe from the bottom brings up all the notification cards that are pending on your _phone_ and your Google Now activity. Swiping from the top still pulls down a notification shade of sorts, which contains a few screens with quick toggles and a shortcut to the settings menu.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Top shade toggles and shortcuts

Tapping once still brings up the main menu, where a lot has changed. The old mess of various screens and menus has been cleared up and your apps are now neatly organized in a single list along with other watch functions.

The top of the screen contains the three most often used applications, which is definitely convenient. Swiping left from here brings you to your contacts and an additional swipe pulls up Google Voice Search, as well as a list of useful command suggestions. The menu structure is now a lot cleaner and much more orderly, which is a definite plus, as any saved tap or scroll counts on such a small screen.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The main menu is now logically arranged in tabs

At first glance, Android Wear users won't really notice anything new, that is, until you get your first notification while browsing the menus. Notifications can now appear on top of other interface items and you can deal with them from anywhere in the interface, much like you would on your phone. This may not sound like much, but takes user-friendliness to a whole new level - not without a sense of multi-tasking.

Speaking of new UI dynamics, Android Wear now has hand gestures, which are reasonably intuitive. You just flick your wrist up or down to scroll through notifications. Sadly, this doesn't work in the menus or any apps, but it is quite convenient for reviewing your notifications almost hands-free.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Richer settings menu

Accessibility is also improved with the new Android Wear. There is even a separate menu for it, which currently only contains a toggle for triple-tap magnification. There is also an option to edit font size and more may come in the future.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

More accessibility options are now available

Another cool new feature Google has thrown in is Draw emoji. It is distantly reminiscent of Apple's feature. Doodle a simple shape on the screen and Wear will suggests a few emoticons that might match what you're trying to achieve.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

New draw emoji feature

The whole process works fairly well and does a pretty good job of recognizing basic shapes, like a single line, a tick or a rectangle. Even a thumbs up wasn't a challenge, which is great. But we find it awkward that instead of sending the other party directly your doodle - like the Apple Watch, for instance, - Android Wear will try to convert it to a standard Emoji. In the same time, there is no way to access the list of built-in Emojis and pick straight from there instead of doodling them.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Recognition works fairly well, but the concept is still questionable

Wi-Fi is another big addition to Android Wear. The new hardware feature is sure to catch along quickly in the wearable niche, as it opens room for a whole new set of possibilities and use cases. Having a separate wireless connection allows the Watch Urbane to be a lot more independent from your phone. It can even receive notifications from the handset it is synched with even outside Bluetooth range, as long as both have a working internet connection.

Apps

As for the preinstalled apps, not much has changed with the new OS and most things are borrowed from the LG G Watch R. There are still some notable new additions. The agenda app is pretty self-explanatory. It pulls your calendar items and lets you browse. Sadly, there is still no way to add a task from the app itself. This, however, can be done via a voice command and, seeing how you don't really have any way to type it out, the decision is all but justified.

Other familiar features include a timer and an alarm app, both with nothing really new to offer. Naturally, you can also ping to locate your phone.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Familiar agenda, alarm and find _phone_ apps

Another neat little trick is the added flashlight feature. All it does is blast the brightness and set a white background on the watch, but it is pretty convenient for getting around in the dark.

LG Watch Urbane

Simple flashlight

The LG Watch Urbane is trying to carry more sophistication than its predecessor, but it is still quite capable as a casual fitness tracker. The pedometer and heart-rate sensor are both available, even if the exterior doesn't really urge towards a messy exercise session.

This being said, Google Fit integration is readily available and practically always on. The device is constantly keeping track of your steps. You can disable the tracking altogether. The Google Fit app itself is unchanged, but it really doesn't need to be as it already does what it sets out to achieve. For the most part, it is independent from your phone and doesn't even need its full Android counterpart installed on the handset.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Google Fit app

If, however, you really don't like using Google's fitness app, but still wouldn't mind checking your pulse from time to time, LG has you covered. One of the new additions in the Watch Urbane is LG Pulse. It does exactly what it says on the tin, but with a twist. Besides measuring your pulse once, on demand, like Google Fit does, you can just leave LG's own app on. This means, it will continue measuring your heart rate until further notice.

Presumably, the concept here is that you can track your heart rate throughout an entire exercise session, but this is more of a gimmick than an actual feature. The PPG heart rate sensor on the Watch Urbane, just like other smartwatches works by detecting subtle changes in the skin. Hence, it is inherently erratic. We even managed to measure a steady heart rate of about 88 beats on nothing but air while the watch was off our wrist. The point being, that you really want to stand still to give the watch a better chance of giving you a fairly accurate reading.

However, it is definitely worth noting that LG put a lot of effort into the Pulse app. It is beautifully crafted, has nice little features like keeping a history and even a dedicated low-energy consumption mode, just like the watch faces.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

New LG Pulse app

The LG Watch Urbane is also more than capable of handling your voice and text communication. As already mentioned, the second tab on the main menu is a contacts browser. It is organized in much the same way as the apps pane. The contacts you frequent most are on top, followed by an alphabetical list. Clicking on an entry brings up the options to call, send a text or email.

Both text options bring up a voice-typing interface, along with emoji drawing and some useful present messages. Calling simply initiates a voice call on your handset.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Default contacts, messaging and calling

An LG Call app preloaded on the Watch Urbane requires installing a counterpart on the smartphone, but it is a background service and leaves almost no trace of its presence.

The app itself does almost the same as the default contacts feature in Android Wear 5.1.1, making its inclusion a little bit questionable. It does, however, offer quick access to favorites and a dedicated dialer, so the added functionality is there.

The app was initially said to only support the Watch Urbane, leaving a lot of unhappy G Watch R owners. It later became clear that it only requires the new version of Android Wear, which the G Watch R is getting. So, everything should be fine once the older wearable gets the software update.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

New LG Call app for Android wear

Final thoughts

In many ways, the LG Watch Urbane is a regular member of the company's smartwatch line. It is a new product, with a fresh exterior, trying to target a different demographic. In all fairness, it isn't much different from the G Watch R after all. The hardware in the pair is almost identical, to such a degree that even the apparent inclusion of Wi-Fi, is nothing more than utilizing a radio that was already there.

So, the true question here isn't really whether the Watch Urbane is good or bad. LG has definitely managed to refine the G Watch R, with no glaring compromises. The real head scratcher is whether or not the new business attire is worth the extra $100. This is by no means a small amount, especially considering smartwatches are a long way from becoming a must-have.

LG Watch Urbane

So, the LG Watch Urbane puts us in quite an awkward situation, where the only thing we can really judge it by is looks. That, of course, is absolutely subjective. Arguably, the Watch Urbane has more class than its predecessor, which in turn has better off-road abilities, so to speak. Plus, the all-black exterior of the G Watch R isn't too shabby either.

A sensible buyer looking for their first smartwatch should have no trouble picking a favorite. The G Watch R is the practical choice, and not just because of price. It's the watch for your runs and workouts while the Urbane doesn't quite belong on a wrist of a hand that's about to get dirty. There is really no right or wrong answer here. If you appreciate the more upscale looks and independence (read Wi-Fi), the extra $100 may as well be justified.

But let's put the sibling rivalry aside for a moment and analyze the Watch Urbane for what it is. Here is what we gathered from our tests.

Key Test Findings:

  • Compared to other round wearables, the Watch Urbane is bigger than the Moto360, but also a little thinner than the Huawei Watch;
  • Build quality is top notch, if you don't like the wrist strap you can change it with a standard 22mm one;
  • The 1.3" P-OLED display is sharp enough and has deep blacks;
  • You can count on 2 days of moderate usage on a single charge. Be prepared for less, however, if you are going to need plenty of Wi-Fi;
  • The new Android Wear 5.1.1 is still a little rough around the edges, but is a major improvement over its predecessor in terms of ease of use and convenience;
  • The software advantage will be short-lived as the new Android Wear platform gets more widely available.
  • LG has gone the extra mile packing a few interesting custom apps into the Watch Urbane. They do work as intended and add value;
  • Wi-Fi is a nice extra feature to have that opens up new possible use cases but the controversy around the G Watch R and its dormant Wi-Fi capabilities raise some valid questions about sales tactics and might end up harming the Watch Urbane;

A while ago, when the Apple Watch had just come out, we asked you to compare the Cupertino wearable and to a number of competing smartwatches. Beside quite a bit of skepticism of the Apple Watch, we did also see quite a lot of love for the Moto 360.

Even though it is essentially a first generation device and doesn't really have a truly circular display, the Moto 360 is still a fan favorite. Perhaps, this is because it offers all the convenience of Android Wear at a very competitive price, while still offering a beautiful exterior and quite a lot of customization options. It does run on lesser hardware, but that isn't really a big deal, seeing how it has more than enough power to behave more than decently.

This leads us to think that smartwatch buyers still approach the gadgets from a practical perspective and might consequently be less inclined to pay a premium just for looks. This sounds reasonable, but there is also the fact that Huawei's high-end watch also gets a lot of fan love.

Anyway, all of them are pretty much still in no man's land between a gadget and a fashion accessory, along the traditional timepiece lines. With the Watch Urbane, LG is definitely leaning towards the latter. The results look promising, but it's still anybody's guess whether the new styling will be enough to draw a whole new crowd, other than geeks, which seems to be what LG is betting on.

Unboxing

With the Watch Urbane, LG has decided to go with a two-piece square box, which is a lot more compact than that of the G Watch R. The material itself makes quite a good first impression. It is neither glossy, nor too plain, with a sort of satin finish that feels soft and premium. Whatever the coating, the box, as well as the internal compartments, are extra pleasant to the touch.

The inside of the box is neatly packed with the watch siting comfortable on a cradle of the aforementioned material and underneath it, three separate containers. LG obviously paid due attention to the packaging and, frankly, presentation plays no smaller part in the premium category than the actual content. Other than that, the Watch Urbane is bundled with the same set of accessories as its predecessor.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

Unboxing the LG Watch Urbane

Inside the box, you get a sturdy USB cable, a power adapter and the proprietary round charging dock. The round magnetic station works exactly the same and looks almost identical, with five pins to the side and an LG Logo in the middle.

This led us to believe that the two chargers are interchangeable, but this is not exactly the case. The Watch Urbane doesn't fit seamlessly in the older G Watch R's dock. The magnet still pulls it in, but the match just isn't perfect. With some fiddling, you'll be able to properly position it to get charged if you have to but it just won't be as comfortable as using the original.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The Watch Urbane has a slightly changes charging dock

Design and build quality

The Watch Urbane is definitely targeted at a different audience. Whereas the G Watch R was a little bit sportier with its black plastic casing, the obvious intention with the Watch Urbane was to bring a lot more class to the exterior. Both devices are stylish, but in quite different ways.

The LG Watch Urbane is a lot more sophisticated and "grown-up". Its metal body and stitched leather strap give out a more classic timepiece feel. Really, it is quite simple, the G Watch R is something you could wear jogging or riding a bike, while the Watch Urbane feels better suited to more formal settings.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The LG Watch Urbane sports a very classic look

The sensors are all still there and you could definitely use the Watch Urbane in your workouts just like its predecessor, but its exterior isn't really the mud-sweat-and-gear type. Speaking of, the silver metal body is quite slick, but easily covered in smudges. On the back, things are a lot cleaner. The plate is still metal, but with a matte finish and a circular brushed-metal accent, covering most of the area. It definitely looks and feels classier than the all-plastic shell of its predecessor.

LG Watch Urbane

The overall shape of the unit is quite similar to the one of the G Watch R, but slightly slimmer all-around. The exact measurements are 45.5 x 52.2 x 10.9mm and the watch weighs in at 66.5 grams. It is clearly elongated and the angle at which it slopes toward the strap is a lot softer. So, even though the Watch Urbane is smaller on paper, its shape makes it look a bulkier when put on. It is also a few grams heavier, undoubtedly due to the metal shell. After wearing both devices for quite some time, there is a noticeable difference. The Watch Urbane simply refuses to lay as close to your wrist as the G Watch R.

LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane
LG Watch Urbane

The little accents tie everything together

The metal bezel is notably thinner and has a softer slope toward the screen. The painted number dial is also missing, which we are sure nobody will miss. The strap on the LG Watch Urbane is made of genuine leather and so was the one on the G Watch R. This time around, however, the design benefits from nice little accent such as the stitching and a buckle in the same color as the body.

The Watch Urbane comes in two color options. The silver, which we have, has an almost chrome-like finish, while the other is a more garish rose gold. Part of the effort perhaps to target a different demographic than geeks and outdoor enthusiasts. Maybe even reaching out to potential female buyers but, frankly, we can't really see the Watch Urbane pulling this one off.

The strap is once again a standard 22mm, so it can be easily swapped out. Perhaps a metal one down the road would make a difference too. Anyway, the current one is made of leather, like the G Watch R's, but it just looks and feels better. The material is a lot more solid and the finish looks more durable, which was definitely a problem for the G Watch R.

The buckle on the LG Watch Urbane has gotten quite a bit smaller. It is made of metal, just like the body and really feels sturdy. Plus, you can't go wrong with such a classic mechanism. It just works and adds another nice touch to the overall appearance.

LG Watch Urbane

The main goal of the Watch Urbane really seems to be a different kind of appeal. The device does look a lot more sophisticated, a clear attempt to make a geeky gadget more relevant in a corporate setting.

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